Where do Tweedles Come From?


Before you read this article, you must first understand that some of it isn’t going to make much sense without some explanation. So, for any of this to make any sense, may I invite you a few thousand years into the future, to a strange new world.

  • Where the past has been forgotten and replaced by a collection of Lewis Carroll’s books, which are the basis of a theocratic city.
  • Where ecosystems were artificially crafted centuries ago through bio-engineering out of necessity.
  • Where technology has radically changed and clockwork and circuitry are married into an efficient hybrid that runs everything from kettles to computers.
  • Where robotic ravens are hunted for parts that power flying craft that navigate above the skyscrapers.
  • Let me invite your imagination into this city. A city called Wonderland.

*  *  *

In previous posts, I’ve explained very briefly what my Tweedles are, but in the next few posts, I would like to go into much more detail. I want to clarify what they are. They’re origins. How they think. What they’re made of. In this post, I will discuss how Tweedles are made, where they come from and why.

IMG_6404

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So where to begin?

 “Begin at the beginning,” the King said, very gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.” – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

In the beginning, there was a pile of scrap electronics and clockwork on someone’s desk. This someone wanted to create something to assist him with his plans. This someone hired a mechanic to build this something, and this something was the first Tweedle. How is a Tweedle made? Scrap materials are turned into small pistons, hinges and other moving parts controlled by thin wires that wrap most of these parts and conceal them. Fluid-wires (a technology found in various household appliances in Wonderland) are added to create the hands and parts of arms and legs, that are too small for pistons to fit. Small sensor parts are used for the eyes. Not every part of a Tweedle is easily made… Advanced robots, in the guise of ravens, fly around everywhere. No-one knows where they came from or what they do. These ‘ravens’ are hunted for various reasons by various people. Some people use the levitation devices that keep these robots afloat are used to build flying ships, and some people use it’s parts to make Tweedles. When building a Tweedle, there are two parts you would want to take from a raven:

  • Small, powerful batteries are scavenged because they provide an almost infinite supply of power.
  • Fragments of a microscale supercomputer that are used to help made the Tweedle’s brain.

How do you build it’s brain? Their brain is actually made up of living brain cells that are integrated into the microscopic supercomputer parts. The brain cells are home grown with what is left of the bioengineering technologies created a few centuries ago. The supercomputer parts contain vast quantities of information and knowledge, and the brain cells allow the Tweedle to feel some degree of emotion. This combination of living tissue and artifical processing power provides the Tweedle with a form of artificial intelligence. Finally, Tweedles need something to keep all the brain/computer parts safe. This is done by wrapping the parts in a piece of cloth, with holes for the eyes to stick out through. A smile is stitched on to help hold the fabric in place. And voila… you end up with a Tweedle!

tweedle without mask - Copy

A Tweedle with it’s cloth removed, exposing the insides.

Where do they come from?

Tweedles are built by mechanics working for revolutionaries in workshops, hidden across the city. They are released into the streets to perform tasks for these revolutionaries.

Why build a Tweedle in the first place?

The man who ordered the construction of Tweedles is the leader of a revolutionary group who want to expose the secrets that Wonderland’s government have been hiding and freeing the people of their influence. They plan on doing this by sabotaging and deconstructing important machines that the military and police are dependent on, and assassinating the leaders, then broadcasting the truth for all to hear. The problem is, a revolutionary group consisting only of a few hundred people isn’t capable of taking on the military. They would need a expendable army of their own. And that’s what the Tweedles are. Tweedles can sneak undetected into armouries and dismantle guns. They can bring the pieces back to their masters to build more Tweedles. At a later stage, when Tweedles became more intelligent, they could build and control their own large exosuits and act as soldiers.

 * * *

So now you know about the origins of Tweedles.

I think I’ll discuss the Tweedles’ development as they learn and become more aware, and the culture they start to form among themselves in a later post. Thanks for reading!

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Posted on May 13, 2014, in Article, Craft, Sketch/Drawing and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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